Magnetics

Usually, a Defect in a Diamond Is a Bad Thing

Usually, a defect in a diamond is a bad thing… But for engineers, miniscule blips in a diamond’s otherwise stiff crystal structure are paving the way for ultrasensitive quantum sensors that push the limits of today’s technologies.

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How to Create Magnetic Skyrmions in Ultra-Short Time Scales Using Pulses of Laser Light

In a new study, researchers Claudio Verdozzi from Lund University and Emil Viñas Boström and Angel Rubio from the Max Planck Institute for the Structure and Dynamics of Matter in Hamburg have found a new approach. “In our study, we have theoretically shown how it is possible to meet one of these requirements, that is, how to create magnetic skyrmions in ultra-short time scales using pulses of laser light”, says Claudio Verdozzi, physics researcher at Lund University.

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Magnetic Interactions Could Point To Miniaturizing Quantum Devices

In new research from the U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE) Argonne National Laboratory, scientists have achieved efficient quantum coupling between two distant magnetic devices, which can host a certain type of magnetic excitations called magnons. These excitations happen when an electric current generates a magnetic field. Coupling allows magnons to exchange energy and information. This kind of coupling may be useful for creating new quantum information technology devices.

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Physicists Demonstrate Exotic Superconductivity With Possible Implications for Quantum Computing

MIT physicists and colleagues have demonstrated an exotic form of superconductivity in a new material the team synthesized only about a year ago. Although predicted in the 1960s, until now this type of superconductivity has proven difficult to stabilize. Further, the scientists found that the same material can potentially be manipulated to exhibit yet another, equally exotic form of superconductivity.

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The Economist S&T: Physics Seeks the Future

Whatever the causes of these two results, they do show that there is something out there which established explanations cannot account for. Similarly unexplained anomalies were starting points for both quantum theory and relativity. It looks possible, therefore, that what has seemed one of physics’s darkest periods is about to brighten into a new morning.

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The Economist S&T: Physics Seeks the Future

Whatever the causes of these two results, they do show that there is something out there which established explanations cannot account for. Similarly unexplained anomalies were starting points for both quantum theory and relativity. It looks possible, therefore, that what has seemed one of physics’s darkest periods is about to brighten into a new morning.

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