Quantum Materials

Unique Quantum Material Could Enable Ultra-powerful, Compact Computers | Columbia Quantum Initiative

Information in computers is transmitted through semiconductors by the movement of electrons and stored in the direction of the electron spin in magnetic materials. To shrink devices while improving their performance—a goal of an emerging field called spin-electronics (“spintronics”)—researchers are searching for unique materials that combine both quantum properties.

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Material-Design Tools Taking On Quantum Monte Carlo Methods, Approximation of the Schrodinger Equation

A multi-institutional effort that includes researchers from Argonne, Lawrence Berkeley, and Oak Ridge National Laboratories is now underway to prepare QMCPACK for deployment on forthcoming, GPU-powered exascale machines, including the ALCF’s Aurora supercomputer. The greatly expanded computational power and parallelism of exascale will enable predictive capabilities far beyond the capacity of QMCPACK’s current implementation.

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Indispensable Research for Future Information and Computing Technologies Conducted by U.S. Department of Energy

A team led by the Department of Energy’s Oak Ridge National Laboratory has found a rare quantum material in which electrons move in coordinated ways, essentially “dancing.” Straining the material creates an electronic band structure that sets the stage for exotic, more tightly correlated behavior – akin to tangoing – among Dirac electrons, which are especially mobile electric charge carriers that may someday enable faster transistors. The results are published in the journal Science Advances.

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Need Ultrafast Information Processing? Try Topological Materials for Ultrafast Spintronics

The laws of quantum physics rule the microcosm. They determine, for example, how easily electrons move through a crystal and thus whether the material is a metal, a semiconductor or an insulator. Quantum physics may lead to exotic properties in certain materials: In so-called topological insulators, only the electrons that can occupy some specific quantum states are free to move like massless particles on the surface, while this mobility is completely absent for electrons in the bulk.

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Need Ultrafast Information Processing? Try Topological Materials for Ultrafast Spintronics

The laws of quantum physics rule the microcosm. They determine, for example, how easily electrons move through a crystal and thus whether the material is a metal, a semiconductor or an insulator. Quantum physics may lead to exotic properties in certain materials: In so-called topological insulators, only the electrons that can occupy some specific quantum states are free to move like massless particles on the surface, while this mobility is completely absent for electrons in the bulk.

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